Simple Strategies : What Can I do to Help My Students?


teacher-helping-four-studentsI think that all teachers have amazing and engaging teaching strategies that we use with the students in our classroom.  It’s almost like we are born with creativity and ways to help children and reach families.  Creativity is a large part of developing engaging teaching strategies.  Having the background of how children grow and develop and what their background knowledge is also important to know and understand before you start introducing and teaching young children.   This article will give you several teaching strategies that are important to use in an early childhood classroom.

  1. Modeling:  Everything you say or do and how you react to situations or handle students is being watched by the children in your classroom.  They will go home and say what you say and they think your way is the only way to do something and they will tell their parent you are right.   So, don’t forget as you are going about your daily schedule that you need to model the correct behaviors, transitions and actions that you except out of your students.  This can be as simple as: role playing situations, correctly sitting at your desk, speaking to other adults, using correct vocabulary, speaking in complete sentences, entering the classroom and greeting each person, etc.

  2. Scaffolding:  As you guide your students in their learning of new and important information and material ask questions, show them how to do until they get the hang of it.

  3. Acknowledge, Encourage, Listen and Ask Questions: When students talk, ask questions and  look them in the eye, acknowledge their conversation and participate with them.  Encourage your students in every aspect of the classroom (curriculum, play, achievements, and even mistakes—children are in your care to learn).  There are always ways to encourage your students and help them feel better about themselves.  Listen to what your students have to say. They have great thoughts and ideas—you may just learn something from them.  Ask your students questions, get them to logically and critically think about different situations and projects.  Students will see that you care if you acknowledge them, encourage them, listen to them and ask them questions.

  4. Show/Demonstrate: give your students examples; show them how to correctly do something or the correct procedures of doing something.  Remember students are in our care to learn, let’s teach them and not just assume or expect them to know something or how to do something.

  5. Repertoire of Ideas: This means using hands-on, engaging, differentiated and developmentally appropriate practices.  Centers, large group, small group, one-on-one instruction, procedures, rules, expectations and effective transitions are just a few.  

When you break the repertoire of ideas down then you can identify, define and differentiate for each student.   If something isn’t working, change it up, or do it differently. This means you can make a change the next year or even the very next day.  Just like no two students are alike, no two classrooms or class rosters are alike.  Many of these things take time and organization, and the title of this article is “What Can I do To Help my Students”, being prepared to teach your students each day is a number one priority.  I challenge you to take one of these ideas and use it today.


This guest post was written by Tisha Shipley. Tisha has a doctorate of education in Curriculum and Instruction and has taught multiple grade levels at Moore Public Schools, including pre–K and gifted 3rd–6th graders.

You can find Tisha online in these places:

Website
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Reflective Teaching in Early Childhood Education

Reflective Teaching

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This holiday season, the best gift I received was a beautiful, fabric-covered journal.  Over the past couple of week, I contemplated how to make the best use of the journal, as well as the opportunity it affords me to reflect upon and record my thoughts. I was reminded of one of my favorite quotes from John Dewey: “We do not learn from experience… we learn from reflecting on experience.” Continue reading Reflective Teaching in Early Childhood Education

Teacher Spotlight: Kristl Wong

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An Interview  with TK Teacher Kristl Wong

A couple of days ago, I had a chance to interview Kristl Wong, a transitional kindergarten teacher at Foster City Elementary School in Foster City, CA (Her sister is Jadelyn Chang, whose interview was published last week.) Kristl uses Kaymbu everyday in her classroom, and absolutely loves the video feature in particular.  She told me all about the awesome ways she is using Kaymbu and shared a great tip for fellow teachers! Continue reading Teacher Spotlight: Kristl Wong

Teacher Spotlight: Jadelyn Chang

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Recently, I had a chance to interview Jadelyn Chang, a kindergarten teacher at Foster City Elementary School in Foster City, CA. Jadelyn is an absolute rock star with the Kaymbu system, which she uses everyday in her kindergarten classroom. She told me all about the cool ways she is using Kaymbu and even gave me some awesome tips to share with other teachers!

Continue reading Teacher Spotlight: Jadelyn Chang